Pet info

Care info

image53

Exotics have many unique husbandry requirements that need to be met to ensure their health. Click here for info on housing, feeding and more.

Illness in exotics

image54

Exotic pets are masters at hiding signs of illness until they are critically sick. Click here for signs that your pet may be sick. 

Transporting your pet

image55

Click here for information on safely transporting your pet.

Download Care Info

Exotic pets are truly amazing, but also incredibly varied in their environmental, social and dietary needs. It is a pleasure, a privilege and a responsibility to bring these wonderful animals into our homes and make them part of our family. To learn more about caring for exotic pets, download the PDFs below.

Illness in exotic pets

Exotic pets are masters at hiding signs of illness until they are critically sick. It is not unusual for exotic pets to present to a veterinarian when their illness is already very advanced. This is why it is important to get your pet checked by a veterinarian if you notice that something is not quite right. If your pet appears healthy, we recommend regular check-ups to maximise the chance of picking up health problems in the early stages. 

Signs of illness

Below is a list of some clinical signs that can indicate your exotic pet is sick:

  • lethargy/reduced activity
  • not eating, reduced appetite, difficulty eating, change in food preference
  • fluffed up (birds)
  • hunched and closing eyes
  • breathing problems, voice loss/change (birds)
  • nasal discharge, eye discharge, sneezing
  • straining, prolapse, abnormal urine/faeces/droppings
  • lack of faeces/urine production
  • bleeding
  • excessive egg laying
  • vomiting/regurgitation, drooling
  • limping, difficulty moving
  • skin lesions, itchy skin, feather/fur loss, feather picking
  • overgrown teeth/beak
  • excessive thirst/appetite
  • abnormal floating in an aquatic species

If you notice any of these signs or anything that is out of the ordinary for your pet, please seek veterinary attention.

Transporting your exotic pet to the vet

To ensure exotic pets stays safe during transport, they should be transported in secure carriers/enclosures.


Birds

  • Small birds (budgies, canaries) can be transported in their regular cage if it is small enough for transport. 
  • Birds living in larger cages or aviaries can be transported in smaller bird cages or small pet plastic carriers. 

Mammals

  • Rabbits, guinea pigs and ferrets can be transported in small pet or cat plastic carriers. 
  • Smaller rodents (rats/mice) can be transported in their regular cage if it is small enough for transport or small pet plastic carriers. 

Reptiles

  • Snakes and lizards can be transported in a pillowcase or a secure plastic container/carrier with ventilation holes.
  • Turtles can be brought in a secure ventilated moistened plastic container (moistened towels on the bottom). Do not transport turtles submerged in water. 

Amphibians (frogs, axolotls)

  • Frogs can be brought in a secure ventilated moistened plastic container (moistened paper towels on the bottom). Do not transport frogs submerged in water. 
  • Axolotls are completely aquatic and must be transported submerged in water. Transport in their own tank water, in a secure container (eg. plastic container, glass container, esky). Axolotls do not tolerate warm water, so prevent overheating during transport. 

Fish

  • Transport in their own tank water, in a secure container (eg. plastic container, glass container, esky). To improve oxygenation during transport, secure the top with a mesh (instead of a solid lid) or use an air stone. 

Aquatic animals (aquatic reptiles (eg turtles), amphibians, fish)

  • Please bring extra tank water for testing or if sedation of your aquatic pet is required
  • For reptiles/frogs: at least 100mL
  • For fish and axolotls: at least as much as the amount of tank water that the pet is coming in

image56